Top 10 Malaysian Food Street dishes, voted by you

Did you participate in the Malaysian Food Street (MFS) “You Eat, You Vote, You Win!” contest? The contest, which ran from April to May 2015, had guests vote for their favourite MFS hawker dish.

The votes have been tallied and here are your Top 10 Favourite Hawker Dish at MFS!

  1. Heun Kee Claypot Chicken Rice
  2. Penang Lim Brothers’ Char Koay Teow
  3. Malacca Chicken Rice Ball
  4. KL Jalan Alor Hokkien Mee
  5. Fung Wong Confectionery
  6. Penang Ah Mei Hokkien Prawn Mee
  7. Penang Assam Laksa
  8. Satay from Straits of Satay
  9. Klang Bak Kut Teh
  10. Penang Lor Bak

Find out more about these tasty dishes.

#1 Heun Kee Claypot Chicken Rice

Heun Kee Claypot Chicken Rice from Malaysian Food Street
Heun Kee Claypot Chicken Rice from Malaysian Food Street

Heun Kee Claypot Chicken Rice was established in 1985 by Madam Heun May Lan. Over the past 30 years, she slowly build her way up and is now an established restaurant operator near Pudu’s wet market!

Ray Teoh, son-in-law of Mdm Huen says that their technique is using chicken broth to cook the rice to give it that yummy, full-bodied flavour and a mix of sesame oil, shallot oil, Chinese wine (Hua Diao Jiu), ginger sauce, and dark soya sauce is then drizzled over the rice. Lastly, it is topped with crispy chicken lard that whets your appetite just by its aroma.

#2 Penang Lim Brothers’ Char Koay Teow

Penang Lim Brothers' Char Koay Teow from Malaysian Food Street
Penang Lim Brothers’ Char Koay Teow from Malaysian Food Street

Unlike the Singapore char koay teow that uses thick dark soy sauce which results in a darker and sweeter dish, Penang char koay teow is saltier and lighter in colour.

Fresh quality ingredients like prawn, Chinese sausage, pork lard and egg are stir-fried with rice noodles over high heat, resulting in “Wok Hei” which is a smokey flavour that is imparted into the noodles (“Wok Hei” also known as “Breath of Wok“).

#3 Malacca Chicken Rice Ball

Malacca Chicken Rice Ball from Malaysian Food Street
Malacca Chicken Rice Ball from Malaysian Food Street

Did you know that in Malacca, the chicken rice is served as rice balls rather than a bowl of rice, more commonly known as Chicken rice balls?

Older chefs say that the rice was originally shaped into balls to keep them warm from the time they were cooked (often earlier in the day) until mealtime. The rice balls, when stored in wooden containers, apparently stayed warm for a longer time.

The other theory is that the rice balls were more portable and were easier for labourers to bring to work at the plantations. Either way, the aromatic and well-flavoured rice is still one of our all-time favourites.

#4 KL Jalan Alor Hokkien Mee

KL Jalan Alor Hokkien Mee from Malaysian Food Street
KL Jalan Alor Hokkien Mee from Malaysian Food Street

Having started the noodle stall in 1976, Mdm Lem has served customers from all walks of life and according to her, the secret to her Hokkien mee recipe is the proportion of light and dark soya sauce that’s drizzled over the noodles when stir-frying. The trick is to achieve a delicate balance between the salty flavour imparted by the light soya sauce and the sweetness from the dark soya sauce.

Together with the freshest ingredients tossed in like lean pork, prawn, squid, and cabbage, the noodle is served with a chilli belachan (shrimp paste) dip. With a recipe perfected over 30 years, KL Jalan Alor Hokkien Mee is renowned for its comforting taste and fragrant aroma, making it one of Kuala Lumpur’s signature dishes.

#5/6 Fung Wong Confectionery

Fung Wong Confectionery pastry from Malaysian Food Street
Fung Wong Confectionery pastry from Malaysian Food Street

Fung Wong Confectionery is best known throughout Kuala Lumpur (where it originated from) for being a modest Chinese bakery retailing Wedding Cakes and assorted Chinese pastries and cookies. Think flaky, buttery pastry wrapped around assorted fillings such as char siew or egg custard that packs a punch when you sink your teeth into it. Yum!

#5/6 Penang Ah Mei Hokkien Prawn Mee

Ah Mei Hokkien Prawn Mee at Malaysian Food Street
Penang Ah Mei Hokkien Prawn Mee from Malaysian Food Street

Hokkien hae mee (Hokkien prawn noodles) is commonly served in Penang and Singapore. The tedious process of cooking the prawn mee starts with boiling the broth with stir-fried crushed prawn shell, pork bones and ground dried chilli for three hours. This results in a hearty, piping hot broth that is paired with fresh prawns, delectable pork ribs with your choice of yellow noodles or rice vermicelli. Sprinkle some fried shallots over it and you’ve got a bowl of comfort food right there.

#7 Penang Assam Laksa

Penang Laksa at Malaysian Food Street at RWS
Penang Laksa from Malaysian Food Street at RWS

Assam Laksa, also called Penang Laksa, is quite different from the Laksa we are so fond of in Singapore. It has a sour taste from using tamarind in the soup base and black shrimp paste to perfect the dish. It is an iconic dish that has fans travelling to Penang just to satisfy their cravings.

#8 Satay from Straits of Satay

Satay at Malaysian Food Street at MFS
Satay at Malaysian Food Street

Satay is a dish of seasoned, grilled meat on sticks that is best paired with a peanut sauce. The nutty flavoured sauce has a dollop of crushed pineapples added to it to give it added fragrance and a spicy kick.

Satay in Singapore is pretty similar to the ones served in Malaysia and you can have your choice of chicken or beef grilled over wood or charcoal fire. Just thinking about it makes our mouths water.

#9 Klang Bak Kut Teh

Klang Bak Kut Teh from Malaysian Food Steet
Klang Bak Kut Teh from Malaysian Food Steet

Bak Kut Teh (literally translated as “Meat Bone Tea”) comprises of tender pork ribs stewed with soy sauce, spices and Chinese herbs to produce a flavourful and heartwarming bowl of comfort soup that is best paired with steamed rice. The herbal taste differs from the peppery Bak Kut Teh that we are used to in Singapore, but it is still as comforting as ever.

#10 Penang Lor Bak

Lor Bak from Malaysian Food Street
Lor Bak from Malaysian Food Street

Lor bak (or lobak) is traditionally accompanied by crispy prawn fritters and fried tau kua (firm bean curd), although nowadays many other ingredients are offered with it: Taiwanese sausages and black century eggs amongst others, together with cucumber that adds a refreshing taste to it. Eat it as a compliment dish to your main, or as a dish by itself. (Psst, we recommend the former, the more dishes the merrier!).

Did you favourite dish make it into the list? Let us know in the comments section.

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